Real Good Pizza, greater

I’ve been going through this Real Good Foods Pizza by the case.

For purely empirical reasons of course.

I’m not that selfless, but it’s the perfect thing to eat on those days when there’s nothing much around to eat, and you’re hungry, and this is just about as good as anything you could imagining wanting to eat anyway. Those days, for, example, when you might just have ordered in a pizza, pre-celiac, pre-primal, pre-keto. Continue reading Real Good Pizza, greater

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Pizza. Finally. #NotJustGood, it’s @RealGoodPizza_

three boxed pizzas on a half sheet pan

If I ever wind up on death row, I’ll get the best wood-fired traditional pizza ever as my last meal and hope the execution happens quickly before the celiac makes me wish it already had.

There are other gluten-free pizza options, and, let’s face it, I’m not interesting enough to do anything likely to get me a parking ticket, let alone sentenced to death row. So I need alternatives, people.

Continue reading Pizza. Finally. #NotJustGood, it’s @RealGoodPizza_

Primal pizza – Mantambre a la pizza

So, after seeing this tantalizing meal on the Food Network, I went for a spin on the internet.

This is a popular snack food in Argentina. There are many recipes out there for how to make it.

Meat pizza.

Flank steak, cut in half horizontally, or pounded thin. Continue reading Primal pizza – Mantambre a la pizza

More eggs baked in meat

It’s a compulsion. I can’t help myself.

No, not really, it’s leftover from this:

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Prosciutto baked to a crisp with some seasoning. The crispiest crunchy thing I’ve been able to achieve with meat-crackers. The even get crisper and more shatter-y as they cool. Meat Doritos. Take these things to a chips and dips event and they will be devoured by the glutenous. Eat your share first.

 

Seed cream — and the PK Protocol

I have lately added some new oils to my life, one a particularly brain-healthy one called PC, or phosphatidylcholine. My doctor told me to be particularly careful about brand here, and not to substitute cheaper versions for the PC oils made by Body Bio, Xymogen, or Nutrasal. Rather than using something cheaper, the doc said to take as much as I could afford of a good brand.

PC oil is a highly refined replacement for something you body naturally produces. It has similarities to, but is NOT the same as, lethicin and unlike the waxy candle-tasting beads of my fab ’70s childhood  when my grandmother took that stuff with everything — and shoved it into me too if I didn’t disappear fast enough — PC oil is water-soluble, and apparently very hard to make. Continue reading Seed cream — and the PK Protocol

“Emergency” chili

I had a couple of bad weekends recently because of drug and supplement reactions. As it turns out, diclofenac, the NSAID I take for pain, doesn’t get along at all with my blood pressure med (candesartan) or with the coumarin in the cinnamon I used to use. I usually don’t use much diclofenac, so the drug didn’t have the opportunity to react with the rest of my daily doses until I had some significant pain.

I took a lot of diclofenac in January, as an old shoulder injury I had flared up again. In the last blood test, done after taking 2-3 diclofenic tablets a day, my kidney and liver functions were all out of whack. Continue reading “Emergency” chili

Great keto infographic (and post) from Factor 75

Factor 75 is one of those pre-prepared meal delivery places with a DIFFERENCE.  The specialize in paleo menus, which are by definition gluten-free; theirs are grass-fed and non-GMO to boot.They have vegetarian and dairy-free options too. Continue reading Great keto infographic (and post) from Factor 75

The sweet potato fly is done

I harvested the  sweet potato fly after four days–that’s from Sunday to Thursday. The pot was just beginning to form small clumps of hard white yeast on the top of, and had tiny bubbles coming up and around the raft of sweet potatoes. The eggshell turned a weird color. Continue reading The sweet potato fly is done

Primal “not” crackers. Sal’ackers, baked salami . . . whatever.

salami1Giada de Laurentis currently has a short 3 minute spot on the Food Network, where she slices a good quality Italian salami and bakes it. Then she tops it with a spoonful of sour cream and a sprig of basil. Her version, is of course, exquisitely beautiful.

I feel guilty in calling this a “recipe.” First, it’s not my idea, second, it’s simple to the “duh” level, and I wish it had occurred to me to do this earlier. Continue reading Primal “not” crackers. Sal’ackers, baked salami . . . whatever.

Bulletproof: something to lose

bulletproof copy
I’m bulletproof, fire away, fire away. I’ve also got more stuff in this cup than the recipe linked below, but more on that another time.

Dave Asprey, who first introduced the idea of bulletproof coffee in 2009, is a person with serious IT street cred, having worked for Trend Micro, Blue Coat and Citrix. According to some sources, he was also among the first to think of putting the caffeine molecule on a tee-shirt. Awesome.

Despite my admiration for his tech chops, the idea of putting butter in coffee seemed a bit, er — yakky — pun intended. Then, I tried it. It tastes pretty good!

The simple recipe for bulletproof coffee is a combination of high-quality coffee, butter, and a fractionalized coconut oil that is composed of medium-chain triglycerides. Continue reading Bulletproof: something to lose

Ketogenics and MS

A ketogenic diet is one in which 60-75 percent of your daily caloric intake comes from fat. Carbs are kept to a minimum, and protein accounts for the rest of the diet. A very strict version of the diet is a lifesaver for some children with epilepsy. Having read quite a few books about auto-immune diseases that mentioned the brain’s need for fat, I decided to try increasing my fat intake while reducing my carbs. Continue reading Ketogenics and MS