A new look for biotin, or, “Breaking Even”

 

OK, folks. I’ve got the white powder. I’ve got the lab equipment. I’ve got the “I’m pissed off and I’m not going to take it anymore” attitude.

I got my OWN sack of pure pharmaceutical-grade biotin, and the tools to use it.

So, no longer stuck in this situation. Continue reading A new look for biotin, or, “Breaking Even”

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Compounded medicine and insurance

Oh, crap. There’s a quiz today. Answer key below.

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Pharmacy benefits managers. Commonly called PBMs.

They sound like such nice people, right? They manage your benefits to shepherd you to optimal health. They do their very best to save you money and improve the quality of your care. Through drugs.

No matter how effed-up your condition. Or despite what your OWN doctor (who by the way, spent about a decade in med school) thinks you need to help you. Continue reading Compounded medicine and insurance

LDN is my best friend — and my drug of choice

prescription bottle containing low dose naltrexone

In mid-2010,  I had been diagnosed with MS for about 18 months. After a year of very bad health, including a low-grade fever, extreme fatigue, highly elevated liver function, and what looked like the start of jaundice, I stopped going to my neurologist, stopped taking my traditional CRAB MS med, and switched to a mixture of enzymes, probiotics, and low-dose naltrexone, better known as LDN. That was the year I left the world of traditional medicine, insurance, and embarked on an active search for a different kind of care.

I had been reading a lot about multiple sclerosis, learned of some people who were altering their health with diet and off-label drugs. Low-dose naltrexone was one drug frequently mentioned as helpful to those with MS. Continue reading LDN is my best friend — and my drug of choice

Exiting the healthcare superhighway

Exit Image by scootiepye. All rights reserved. Check out her Flickr photostream; it’s awesome. Even though it’s gotten awfully full of feathers lately.

I am very appreciative of the number of readers I have from the UK. I apologize that this post might make no sense to you. In the US, national health care is pretty bare-bones. Most people get their primary care from their employer, who contracts with one or more private health insurance companies. You select a plan, and contribute a small amount per month for the level of care you choose for yourself and your family. Continue reading Exiting the healthcare superhighway