Liver-friendly topical pain relief

I have been on a hunt for some pain relief that will not compromise my liver. I figured I’d start from the outside in. I’ve had enough drama involving insides lately, and wanted to give them a break.

While topical creams can avoid gastric complications, some contain ingredients, which when absorbed through the skin, can have the same side effects as those taken internally. You have to be doubly careful if you are using such a cream while also taking an oral pain reliever with similar ingredients.

Pictured here are three pain relievers. Two are “natural” remedies, one is by prescription. Continue reading Liver-friendly topical pain relief

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LDN and pain relief — the nettle and the sting

About three years ago, I fell on some black ice, landing  hard on my palms and one knee. I healed quickly and didn’t think much more about it. However, since, during times of low atmospheric pressure–as in an impending storm, I find that the pain comes back, twice so far, much worse than it was in the original fall.

The first time this happened was extremely painful. I squirmed my way into the car to see my doctor, who prescribed an opiate with many warnings. I took it. Nothing happened–like taking air pills. I had to call back and point out that LDN was an opiate blocker.

Oops. Continue reading LDN and pain relief — the nettle and the sting

Compounded medicine and insurance

Oh, crap. There’s a quiz today. Answer key below.

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Pharmacy benefits managers. Commonly called PBMs.

They sound like such nice people, right? They manage your benefits to shepherd you to optimal health. They do their very best to save you money and improve the quality of your care. Through drugs.

No matter how effed-up your condition. Or despite what your OWN doctor (who by the way, spent about a decade in med school) thinks you need to help you. Continue reading Compounded medicine and insurance

First and second sleep: an occasion for meditation or medication?

alarm clock

I have to say that one side effect of LDN is deep, dreamful  and restful sleep. You go into cat-time on LDN: Sleep, nap, Sleep, snack, nap . . . er, work). Honestly, if I don’t stand up in the morning in order to wake up sufficiently to stagger to the toothbrush, I could sleep all day.

Once up, thanks to toothbrush and a splash of cold water, though, I’m rested and alert, and ready to go.

However, once in a while, a switch seem to be flicked and I have periods of wakefulness. Usually this is short-lived. Continue reading First and second sleep: an occasion for meditation or medication?

LDN is my best friend — and my drug of choice

prescription bottle containing low dose naltrexone

In mid-2010,  I had been diagnosed with MS for about 18 months. After a year of very bad health, including a low-grade fever, extreme fatigue, highly elevated liver function, and what looked like the start of jaundice, I stopped going to my neurologist, stopped taking my traditional CRAB MS med, and switched to a mixture of enzymes, probiotics, and low-dose naltrexone, better known as LDN. That was the year I left the world of traditional medicine, insurance, and embarked on an active search for a different kind of care.

I had been reading a lot about multiple sclerosis, learned of some people who were altering their health with diet and off-label drugs. Low-dose naltrexone was one drug frequently mentioned as helpful to those with MS. Continue reading LDN is my best friend — and my drug of choice