LDN and pain relief — the nettle and the sting

About three years ago, I fell on some black ice, landing¬† hard on my palms and one knee. I healed quickly and didn’t think much more about it. However, since, during times of low atmospheric pressure–as in an impending storm, I find that the pain comes back, twice so far, much worse than it was in the original fall.

The first time this happened was extremely painful. I squirmed my way into the car to see my doctor, who prescribed an opiate with many warnings. I took it. Nothing happened–like taking air pills. I had to call back and point out that LDN was an opiate blocker.

Oops. Continue reading LDN and pain relief — the nettle and the sting

LDN is my best friend — and my drug of choice

prescription bottle containing low dose naltrexone

In mid-2010,  I had been diagnosed with MS for about 18 months. After a year of very bad health, including a low-grade fever, extreme fatigue, highly elevated liver function, and what looked like the start of jaundice, I stopped going to my neurologist, stopped taking my traditional CRAB MS med, and switched to a mixture of enzymes, probiotics, and low-dose naltrexone, better known as LDN. That was the year I left the world of traditional medicine, insurance, and embarked on an active search for a different kind of care.

I had been reading a lot about multiple sclerosis, learned of some people who were altering their health with diet and off-label drugs. Low-dose naltrexone was one drug frequently mentioned as helpful to those with MS. Continue reading LDN is my best friend — and my drug of choice

Exiting the healthcare superhighway

Exit Image by scootiepye. All rights reserved. Check out her Flickr photostream; it’s awesome. Even though it’s gotten awfully full of feathers lately.

I am very appreciative of the number of readers I have from the UK. I apologize that this post might make no sense to you. In the US, national health care is pretty bare-bones. Most people get their primary care from their employer, who contracts with one or more private health insurance companies. You select a plan, and contribute a small amount per month for the level of care you choose for yourself and your family. Continue reading Exiting the healthcare superhighway